CROCK POT CHICKEN STOCK

CROCK POT CHICKEN STOCK

I MIGHT BE LAZY. OR TIRED. OR BUSY…OR A MOM.

 

Either way you want to look at it, the fact remains that I like things to be EASY.

 

Super easy.

 

So easy in fact, that I might be guilty of parking my shoes smack-dab in the middle of multiple doorways in our house, simply because its easier to put them on when I need them. Who cares who trips on them.

 

You can see my dilemma, then, when I started down my stock making journey and Queen Bee Sally Fallon said my stock needed to simmer on the stove for 12-24 hours. I was like “Say what!” Not gonna happen. Ever.  I do not have time to babysit my stove for that long.

 

So, what’s a girl to do? Well, a magical thing happened when I visited the oracle known as “google”. It told me you can make stock in the crock pot! Yay! I don’t have to burn my kitchen down!

 

I know these days with all the political correctness in this world, I probably can’t say this, but I’m gonna: chicken stock really is the most perfect food.

 

It’s super nutritious. Super delicious. And super cheap.

 

Emphasis on that cheap part. Does it get any better than that?

 

The answer is no. Absolutely not. Especially when you have ravenous little mouths who are always begging to be fed and a husband who can eat through the fridge in one sitting. You NEED nutrition and cheap to be together, in one meal, at the same time.

 

Why are they always hungry?

 

Traditional people who lived long, long ago considered stock to be a super food powerhouse, full of gelatin and minerals. It’s a great way to use chicken bones and vegetable ends, ensuring that nothing goes to waste. It’s practically made entirely from scraps! Yeah, baby!

 

Sally Fallon goes into great scientific detail about stock and broth in her book Nourishing Traditions. Do you have this book? Because if you don’t,  you are missing way way way out. (Buy it here.)

 

Once you’ve read the thing cover to cover…haha, just kidding…

 

But seriously, get it. And read it. Your mind will explode with all kinds of nutritional information.

 

Right about now I bet you are asking yourself, “What on earth is the difference between stock and broth?” Well, my friend, today I will answer your question, and it is so simple.

 

It’s a meat vs. bones kind of thing.

 

Broth is made from the meat and bones and is usually flavored with more herbs and spices. Whereas, stock is created when bones are simmered on low for 12-24 hours. The slow, long simmer imparts all the nutritional goodness and flavor that is generally found in stock.

 

A sign that you have made a highly nutritious stock is that it will gel after its been refrigerated. By gelled, I mean like Jell-o gelled. It will jiggle. If it doesn’t, its still worthy of using, don’t chuck it!

 

NOTE: I had a terrible time getting my stock to gel for a long while. It just WOULD NOT GEL. Once I started using our own pasture raised chickens rather than commercially raised ones, that problem went away.

 

Now, what should you do with this super food, you ask?

 

Well, I like talking, so I’ll tell ya. 

  • Drink it! Heat it up on the stove, add a little sea salt or parsley if  you like, and slurp it down. Also, use at the first sign of congestion (this is why I like to freeze it for easy access when we are feeling under the weather.)
  • Vegetables that are simmered in stock taste amazing! Just add a couple cups of stock in a sauce pan bring to a boil, turn down to low and simmer.
  • Add it to your homemade baby food.
  • Use in soups.

 

 

CROCK POT CHICKEN STOCK

YIELDS: about 1/2 gallon stock.

  • 1 whole chicken carcass and all bones 
  • 2-3 carrots (washed/peeled/cut into small pieces)
  • 1-2 stalks of celery (washed/cut into small pieces)
  • 1 onion (peeled/cut into small pieces)
  • 2 Chicken Feet (optional)
  • 2 Tablespoons Raw Apple Cider Vinegar (I use this kind)
  • Parsley (optional)
  • 1 Bay Leaf (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Dump chicken bones, feet, various vegetable pieces and parsley into your crock pot.

veggies for stock 5.3.2016 2

 

2. Fill with COLD, filtered water and add a splash or two of Raw Apple Cider Vinegar. Let this sit for one hour, to release minerals into your stock.

(I usually throw in my stuff while I’m making supper, let it sit in the cold water for an hour, and then during supper clean up, turn it on low and let it go until supper time the following evening.)

3. Turn on low and simmer for 12-24 hours. Remove any scum that rises to the top. I usually check for this once or twice total. 

(About an hour before it is finished, I like to add in a bay leaf which adds wonderful flavor. Totally optional.) 

4. Allow to cool and strain into a bowl. Discard all the vegetables and bones. Unbleached cheesecloth works great for straining. Or a tea towel, if you’re cheap. 

photo (19)5. Store in a glass jar in the fridge. Once it congeals, remove the fat that rises to the top. This will last about 1 week in the fridge. I like to measure out 2 cup servings and store in baggies in the freezer. 

NOTES:

  • If I am needing to make Chicken Noodle Soup for supper, I will start a frozen bird with the meat on high in the morning, and turn it on low in the afternoon. Before supper, I will remove the meat and strain out all the vegetables. Then, I will add all my broth to a large stockpot and add in the shredded chicken, new carrots, celery and noodles for soup. Way easy! 
  • If you don’t have all the vegetables listed, don’t despair! All you really need to make stock is the bones and cold water. The other stuff just adds in wonderful minerals.
  • Layer hens and roosters make the most wonderful tasting stock!
  • If you butcher your own chickens, always save the feet. They add in a ton of collagen to your stock.

CROCK POT CHICKEN STOCK
AUTHOR: 
RECIPE TYPE: Main Dish
COOK TIME: 
TOTAL TIME: 
YIELDS: ½ gallon of stock
 
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 whole chicken carcass and all bones
  • 2-3 carrots (washed/peeled/cut into small pieces)
  • 1-2 stalks of celery (washed/cut into small pieces)
  • 1 onion (peeled/cut into small pieces)
  • 2 Chicken Feet (optional)
  • 2 Tablespoons Raw Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Parsley (optional)
  • 1 Bay Leaf (optional)
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Dump chicken bones, feet, various vegetable pieces and parsley into your crock pot.
  2. Fill with COLD, filtered water and add a splash or two of Raw Apple Cider Vinegar. Let this sit for one hour, to release minerals into your stock. (I usually throw in my stuff while I'm making supper, let it sit in the cold water for an hour, and then during supper clean up, turn it on low and let it go until supper time the following evening.)
  3. Turn on low and simmer for 12-24 hours. Remove any scum that rises to the top. I usually check for this once or twice total.
  4. About an hour before it is finished, I like to add in a bay leaf which adds wonderful flavor. Totally optional.
  5. Allow to cool and strain into a bowl. Discard all the vegetables and bones. Unbleached cheesecloth works great for straining. Or a tea towel, if you're cheap.
  6. Store in a glass jar in the fridge. Once it congeals, remove the fat that rises to the top. This will last about 1 week in the fridge. I like to measure out 2 cup servings and store in baggies in the freezer.
NOTES
-If I am needing to make Chicken Noodle Soup for supper, I will start a frozen bird with the meat on high in the morning, and turn it on low in the afternoon. Before supper, I will remove the meat and strain out all the vegetables. Then, I will add all my broth to a large stockpot and add in the shredded chicken, new carrots, celery and noodles for soup. Way easy!
-If you don’t have all the vegetables listed, don’t despair! All you really need to make stock is the bones and cold water. The other stuff just adds in wonderful minerals.
-Layer hens and roosters make the most wonderful tasting stock!
-If you butcher your own chickens, always save the feet. They add in a ton of collagen to your stock.

 

CROCK POT CHICKEN STOCK

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